Cur Deus Homo I.19-25

(Continuing from our digression on angels in CDH I.16-18)

“By what reason or necessity did God become man and by His death, just as we believe and profess, return life to the world when He was able to do this through another person, either angelic or human, or by His will alone?” (CDH I.1)

What Anselm has covered so far:

  1. Sin is a problem that must be fixed.  God cannot ignore it or His plan would fail.
  2. God cannot delegate this task to another creature or we would no longer be servants of God alone and equal to the holy angels.
  3. Sin is a problem of justice.  Every injustice has a primary fault–depriving someone of their due–and a secondary fault–damaging that person’s honor.  Each of these facets of injustice cause the order of the universe to be disrupted.  Until each issue has been resolved, disorder reigns.
  4. There are only two ways to resolve the secondary damage to honor: punishment and satisfaction.
  5. The punishment of hell fails to re-order the universe because, by resolving one disorder, another is caused or perpetuated.

So that brings us to the most famous part of Anselm’s argument, wherein he addresses the problem of satisfaction.  This is why Anselm’s argument is often referred to as the “Satisfaction Theory.”

The Analogy of the Pearl

Before diving into his analysis of the satisfaction horn, Anselm returns to the idea that God cannot simply ignore the problem of sin.  He refreshes the dilemma by relating the problem of sin in the form of a short allegory. Continue reading Cur Deus Homo I.19-25

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Cur Deus Homo I.16-18

(Continuing from justice and order in CDH I.11-15)

“By what reason or necessity did God become man and by His death, just as we believe and profess, return life to the world when He was able to do this through another person, either angelic or human, or by His will alone?” (CDH I.1)

Angels.  The answer is angels!

In order to close out his discussion of punishment Anselm has to show hell’s insufficiency for restoring order to the universe.  His strong case for punishment as an instrument of order and beauty in chapters fourteen and fifteen makes that difficult.  If it works so well, why not just let the punishment of hell regulate the order and beauty of the universe and be done with the problem of justice?

The problem, it turns out, is not intrinsic to punishment itself.  Instead the punishment of hell conflicts with God’s original plan for mankind and the universe.  Anselm alludes to this divine plan way back in chapters four and five when setting the initial argument with Boso and insisting that God must do something about sin.  In chapters sixteen through eighteen, Anselm returns to that idea and makes the plan explicit.

Working from his favorite Patristic source, St. Augustine, Anselm extends the idea about the order and beauty of the universe.  As God is supremely wise, all that He does must be supremely orderly and proportional–beautiful, as we have said many times.  Part of the order and beauty of the universe, indeed the pinnacle of that order and beauty, is the City of God, the kingdom of heaven itself.  It is the signet of perfection; that anything detract from this perfection is impossible.

The supreme order and beauty of the City of God no doubt has many aspects, but Anselm focuses on one in particular: it has an ideal number of citizens.  No one can know this number save God, but Anselm commits to there being such a number.  That’s a big problem, since sin destroyed that ideal number.

No, not the sin of Adam.  The sin of the angels. Continue reading Cur Deus Homo I.16-18

Cur Deus Homo I.11-15

(Continuing from the excursus on CDH I.6-10)

“By what reason or necessity did God become man and by His death, just as we believe and profess, return life to the world when He was able to do this through another person, either angelic or human, or by His will alone?” (CDH I.1)

The argument of Cur Deus Homo begins in earnest in chapter eleven.  It’s possible to stumble through the first ten chapters and still more or less understand St. Anselm’s book, but anyone not understanding these next few chapters will be absolutely incapable of understanding the rest of the book.  This is where the detail work begins.  Errors at this stage are fatal.  Anyone looking to take down the argument should start taking careful notes from here on out.

Anselm is going to propose a theory of justice–often called the Satisfaction Theory, for reasons that are about to be very obvious–and then use that theory to create a dilemma.  In the technical sense a dilemma is a set of mutually exclusive propositions A and B that exhaust all the possible options.  You can only choose one of the two options and you must choose.  For the rest of the book Anselm plans to exploit that dilemma to prove the necessity of the Incarnation.  The way he does this is a little strange, but we’ll comment on that as the argument goes along. Continue reading Cur Deus Homo I.11-15

Cur Deus Homo I.6-10

(continuing from the initial stages of the dialogue in CDH I.3-5)

“By what reason or necessity did God become man and by His death, just as we believe and profess, return life to the world when He was able to do this through another person, either angelic or human, or by His will alone?” (CDH I.1)

I have mixed feelings about presenting the next block of chapters in Cur Deus Homo.  On the one hand I regard these chapters as a messy excursus that adds very little to the overall argument of the book.  As a result I don’t teach these chapters to my students, instead skipping directly to the theory of justice and satisfaction St. Anselm presents in chapter eleven.  If this series were merely a codification of my teaching, I would do the same here.

However, I’m also making the claim that St. Anselm is not particularly interested in the question of how God saves humanity from sin and death.  To skip any part of the text suggests something shifty about my claim, as if I were cooking the books.  Even more importantly, Anselm and Boso discuss Christ’s death and so at least appear to raise some issues about the mechanics of salvation.  Perhaps I only draw the conclusions I do because I skip these chapters!

Anselm and Boso do address some issues relating to my main claim as well as some useful matters of method for the rest of the book.  Rather than straw-manning St. Anselm or giving the appearance thereof, and since these chapters do have a charm of their own, I’ll go ahead and give a commentary on them here.  Keep in mind that this is “untaught analysis”–nothing like the endlessly repeated, student-questioned material from the other sections of text I have covered already or will in the future.

In theory that means this will be a shorter post! Continue reading Cur Deus Homo I.6-10

Cool Math: Riemann’s Zeta Function

One of my long-standing love affairs in math is with Riemann’s Zeta Function.  I use it as an illustration of a few points in my high school classes.  Since I name-dropped it in my recent series on Cur Deus Homo, I figured I’d cover a bit more about it.  Here’s a fantastic video explanation to a very difficult and fun bit of math.

You should give this guy a follow; he does fantastic work.

Math on!