Translating Psalms (66)

Another highly liturgical psalm, again with more emphasis on the universal human nature than just the people of Israel.  That universality of Israel’s mission is already present in Solomon’s dedication of the Temple, but it’s definitely a minor note that grows stronger as Israel’s history continues to unfold.  If you like playing authorship games, it’s a reason to think of this psalm as a later one.

I however do not care for such games, as they are beside the point.  David sounds an awful lot like a cosmic high priest mediating between God and man.  Almost like a foreshadowing, or even a type of the True Mediator…almost as if the true mediator Himself is speaking these words…hmm…

I’ve played around a bit with the subjunctives to contrast the way David speaks to God and the way he speaks to us.

“Deus misereatur” (Psalm 66)

[1] In finem, in hymnis. Psalmus cantici David.

Unto the end, in hymns.  A psalm of a canticle of David.

[2] Deus misereatur nostri, et benedicat nobis; illuminet vultum suum super nos, et misereatur nostri;

God, may He be merciful to us and bless us; may He illuminate His countenance above us and be merciful to us;

[3] ut cognoscamus in terra viam tuam, in omnibus gentibus salutare tuum.

that we may know on the earth Your way, among all the nations Your salvation.

[4] Confiteantur tibi populi, Deus, confiteantur tibi populi omnes.

Let them confess to You, the people, O God; let them confess to You, all the peoples.

[5] Laetentur et exsultent gentes, quoniam judicas populos in aequitate, et gentes in terra dirigis.

Let them be glad and exsult, the nations, for You judge the peoples in equity and the nations on earth You direct.

[6] Confiteantur tibi populi, Deus, confiteantur tibi populi omnes.

Let them confess to You, the people, O God; let them confess to You, all the peoples.

[7] Terra dedit fructum suum : benedicat nos Deus, Deus noster!

The earth has given its fruit; may He bless us, may God our God!

[8] Benedicat nos Deus, et metuant eum omnes fines terrae.

May He bless us, may God, and let them fear him all the ends of the earth.

==

v. 3 cognoscamus The online source I’m using for these (drbo.org) has what I assume is a scanning error/typo, cognascamus, here.  Either that or Vulgate Latin is even weirder than I realized, cuz that ain’t no Latin word.

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