Translating Psalms (23)

No, not the famous one.  That’s Psalm 22 by Vulgate/Septuagint numbering.  This is a pretty famous one too, though…and not just because Stephen Colbert famously danced to a modern rendering of it.

“Domini est terra” (Psalm 23)

  1. Prima sabbati. Psalmus David. Domini est terra, et plenitudo ejus; orbis terrarum, et universi qui habitant in eo.
  2. Quia ipse super maria fundavit eum, et super flumina praeparavit eum.
  3. Quis ascendet in montem Domini? aut quis stabit in loco sancto ejus?
  4. Innocens manibus et mundo corde, qui non accepit in vano animam suam, nec juravit in dolo proximo suo.
  5. Hic accipiet benedictionem a Domino, et misericordiam a Deo salutari suo.
  6. Haec est generatio quaerentium eum, quaerentium faciem Dei Jacob.
  7. Attollite portas, principes, vestras, et elevamini, portae aeternales, et introibit rex gloriae.
  8. Quis est iste rex gloriae? Dominus fortis et potens, Dominus potens in praelio.
  9. Attollite portas, principes, vestras, et elevamini, portae aeternales, et introibit rex gloriae.
  10. Quis est iste rex gloriae? Dominus virtutum ipse est rex gloriae.

First of the Sabbath.  A Psalm of David.  The Lord’s is the earth, and its fullness; the orb of lands, and all who dwell in it.

For He above the seas has founded it, and above the rivers prepared it.

Who shall ascend unto the mountain of the Lord?  Or who shall stand in His holy place?

Innocent in hands and clean heart, who has not accepted in vane his own soul, nor sworn in deceit to his neighbor.

This one shall accept blessing from the Lord, and mercy from the God of his salvation.

This is the generation those seeking Him, of those seeking the face of the God of Jacob.

Lift up the gates, you princes, yours, and be elevated, eternal gates, and he shall enter, the king of glory.

Who is this, the king of glory?  The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord mighty in battle.

Lift up the gates, you princes, yours, and be elevated, eternal gates, and he shall enter, the king of glory.

Who is this, the king of glory?  The Lord of virtues, He Himself is the king of glory.

==

I hate the verb praeparo.  Paro means prepare.  Praeparo means pre-prepare…?  Nah, just prepare.  But like, really fast.  Actually, I guess I just hate English for using praeparo to translate paro…  Those Anglo-Saxons did some weird stuff.

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